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Although the design used the same elements as the original design, including the saucer-shaped primary hull, warp engine assemblies, and a secondary hull engineering section, Adam's secondary hull was flattened and wedge-shaped, providing a radically different look, not unlike the Star Destroyers that Mc Quarrie helped to design for Star Wars.Interestingly, Mc Quarrie envisioned the designs as capable of performing a saucer separation.

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"Basically," Jefferies said, "what I did to it was change the power units, and make a slight change in the struts that supported them.Probert recalled, "When I started the design phase of the Enterprise, my Art Director, Richard Taylor, showed me these pictures of the ship as it had been designed by Joe Jennings and Matt Jefferies for the Star Trek Television movie now known as: 'Phase II'.He also produced plans of the ship and I was told that this would be our starting point.The models therefore have become canon albeit without neither class designations nor names.The B-24-CLN study model, constructed out of wood and plastic, detailed with hand-applied tape and ink and measuring fifteen inches in length by eight inches wide, eventually turned up on 8 August 2010 as Lot 12 in the Propworx' The official STAR TREK prop and costume auction, estimated at US

"Basically," Jefferies said, "what I did to it was change the power units, and make a slight change in the struts that supported them.Probert recalled, "When I started the design phase of the Enterprise, my Art Director, Richard Taylor, showed me these pictures of the ship as it had been designed by Joe Jennings and Matt Jefferies for the Star Trek Television movie now known as: 'Phase II'.He also produced plans of the ship and I was told that this would be our starting point.The models therefore have become canon albeit without neither class designations nor names.The B-24-CLN study model, constructed out of wood and plastic, detailed with hand-applied tape and ink and measuring fifteen inches in length by eight inches wide, eventually turned up on 8 August 2010 as Lot 12 in the Propworx' The official STAR TREK prop and costume auction, estimated at US$1,000-$2,000, where it sold for US$3,500." Jefferies started work from a drawing he had actually prepared for the Original Series back in 1964, already showing the Enterprise with swept-back, flattened nacelles, to be presented to Roddenberry if he did not like the first version, appropriately annotated with the remark, "change power pods [note: as the nacelles were at the time still called, the terminology carried over from The Original Series] & struts only". 84) Jefferies later sold off his redesign sketches, together with the original alternate one, on 12 December 2001 in the The Star Trek Auction, in order to raise funds for the charity organization "Motion Picture and Television Fund". But when Paramount Pictures abandoned its plans to create a fourth television network in late July 1977, they subsequently transformed the second Star Trek series into a television movie before it morphed into the first theatrical movie feature in mid-November 1977, ultimately announced to the general public on 28 March 1978.

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"Basically," Jefferies said, "what I did to it was change the power units, and make a slight change in the struts that supported them.

Probert recalled, "When I started the design phase of the Enterprise, my Art Director, Richard Taylor, showed me these pictures of the ship as it had been designed by Joe Jennings and Matt Jefferies for the Star Trek Television movie now known as: 'Phase II'.

He also produced plans of the ship and I was told that this would be our starting point.

The models therefore have become canon albeit without neither class designations nor names.

The B-24-CLN study model, constructed out of wood and plastic, detailed with hand-applied tape and ink and measuring fifteen inches in length by eight inches wide, eventually turned up on 8 August 2010 as Lot 12 in the Propworx' The official STAR TREK prop and costume auction, estimated at US$1,000-$2,000, where it sold for US$3,500.

" Jefferies started work from a drawing he had actually prepared for the Original Series back in 1964, already showing the Enterprise with swept-back, flattened nacelles, to be presented to Roddenberry if he did not like the first version, appropriately annotated with the remark, "change power pods [note: as the nacelles were at the time still called, the terminology carried over from The Original Series] & struts only". 84) Jefferies later sold off his redesign sketches, together with the original alternate one, on 12 December 2001 in the The Star Trek Auction, in order to raise funds for the charity organization "Motion Picture and Television Fund". But when Paramount Pictures abandoned its plans to create a fourth television network in late July 1977, they subsequently transformed the second Star Trek series into a television movie before it morphed into the first theatrical movie feature in mid-November 1977, ultimately announced to the general public on 28 March 1978.

,000-,000, where it sold for US,500." Jefferies started work from a drawing he had actually prepared for the Original Series back in 1964, already showing the Enterprise with swept-back, flattened nacelles, to be presented to Roddenberry if he did not like the first version, appropriately annotated with the remark, "change power pods [note: as the nacelles were at the time still called, the terminology carried over from The Original Series] & struts only". 84) Jefferies later sold off his redesign sketches, together with the original alternate one, on 12 December 2001 in the The Star Trek Auction, in order to raise funds for the charity organization "Motion Picture and Television Fund". But when Paramount Pictures abandoned its plans to create a fourth television network in late July 1977, they subsequently transformed the second Star Trek series into a television movie before it morphed into the first theatrical movie feature in mid-November 1977, ultimately announced to the general public on 28 March 1978.

Unlike the first redesign of the Enterprise, Jefferies' new version, subsequently elaborated upon in production art work by Mike Minor and Joe Jennings, was therefore designed along the classical lines of the original, albeit modernized. The last upgrade decision was first and foremost influenced by the run-away success of the first Star Wars film in 1977.

And you also have to remember that you are not dealing with magic.

It can't just look like whatever you want it to look like.

Stored away for the better part of a decade, both models would make surprising reappearances.

Although stated as having both made an appearance in the Battle of Wolf 359 aftermath debris field, featured in Star Trek: The Next Generation's season four episode "", where it was present as B-24-CLN at the Surplus Depot Z15.

Having already worked with him during the second season of The Original Series, Jennings was brought in as art director on recommendation of Jefferies, after the latter expressed an unwillingness to leave his then job at Little House on the Prairie, in order to help out with the re-design work. Studio executives discerned that part of its success were the highly detailed studio models used in that movie, and wanted the notion carried over to the new Enterprise as well.