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Even the gentry might eat modestly in the morning, although they could afford meat or fish...

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The different betweeen the more prosperous households and more modest ones might be in the quality and quantity of the meat served..."Sallats," (salads) though more popular at supper, sometimes were served at dinner and occasionally provided decoration in the center of the table...Cakes were of many varieties: pound, gingerbread, spice and cheese." ---A Cooking Legacy (p. What is there to say about a meal that probably did not even exist for many settlers during the eary days of the Colonies and later seemed more like a bedtime snack made up of leftovers? In the eighteenth century supper was a brief meal and, especially in the South, light and late.Throughout the seventeenth century and well into the eighteenth century it was served in the "hall" or "common room." ..While dinner among the affluent merchants in the North took place shortly after noon, the Southern planters enjoyed their dinner as late as bubbling stews were carried into the fields to feed the slaves and laborers...The first course included several meats plus meat puddings and/or deep meat pies containing fruits and spices, pancakes and fritters, and the ever-present side dishes of sauces, pickles and catsups...

Soups seem to have been served before of in conjunction with the first course. An assortment of fresh, cooked, or dried fruits, custards, tarts and sweetmeats was usually available.

They also used local foods introduced by the Native Americans.

Some European recipes adapted well to these new ingredients. Connecticut Delaware Georgia Maryland Massachusetts (Plimoth colony) New Hampshire New Jersey New York (New Netherlands) North Carolina Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Virginia Breakfast, lunch & dinner? It is important to keep in mind there is no such thing as a "typical colonial meal." The Royal Governor of Virginia ate quite differently from the first Pilgrim settlers and the West Indians laboring in Philadelphia's cookshops.

In the early settlements, poor families ate from trenchers filled from a common stew pot, with a bowl of coars salt the only table adornment.

The earliest trenchers in America, as in the Middle Ages, were probably made from slabs of stale bread which were either eaten with the meal or thrown after use to the domestic animals.

The stews often included pork, sweet corn and cabbage, or other vegetables and roots which were available...